Archive for September 24, 2017

24 September ― 17 ‘Izzat   Leave a comment

 

MORNING:

Far, far from Thy glory be what mortal man can affirm of Thee, or attribute unto Thee, or the praise with which he can glorify Thee! Whatever duty Thou hast prescribed unto Thy servants of extolling to the utmost Thy majesty and glory is but a token of Thy grace unto them, that they may be enabled  to ascend unto the station conferred upon their own inmost being, the station of the knowledge of their own selves.

His Holiness Bahá’u’lláh

Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá’u’lláh, pp:4-5

EVENING:

The beginning of all things is the knowledge of God, and the end of all things is strict observance of whatsoever hath been sent down from the empyrean of the Divine Will that pervadeth all that is in the heavens and all that is on the earth.

His Holiness Bahá’u’lláh

Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá’u’lláh, p. 3

FROM HAND OF THE CAUSE OF GOD Mr. WILLIAM SEARS:

“Let them be led through the streets of the city by this halter,” he commanded. “It will be an object lesson to the people of Shiráz. It will teach everyone who is thinking of embracing this Faith just what the punishment for such action will be!”

Mullá Sádiq was so advanced in age that he knew that he could not possibly survive this torture. Yet he was calm and self-possessed. He raised his eyes to heaven and offered a last prayer. “O Lord, our God! We have heard the voice of the One that called. He called us to His Faith, saying: ‘ Believe ye on the Lord your God!’ We have believed, O God. Forgive us then for our sins, and cause us to die with righteousness.”

An eye-witness to the torture of Mullá Sádiq has given the following testimony: “I was present when Mullá Sádiq was being scourged. I watched them stroke the lash to his bleeding shoulders until he became exhausted. No one watching believed he could outlasted fifty such savage strokes without dying. He was a very old man. We marveled at his courage. “Yet when the number of strokes already exceeded nine hundred, his face still retained its original serenity and calm.

“When he was later being expelled from the city, I approached him with great admiration and asked him how he had been able to withstand such punishment. ” He replied: ‘The first seven strokes were severely painful. To the rest I seemed to have grown indifferent. I was wondering whether the strokes that followed were actually being applied to my own body. A feeling of joy seized me. I was trying to repress my feelings and restrain my laughter.'” Mullá Sádiq looked at this eye-witness, as though trying to convey to him an important truth which he felt all men should know: that suffering, pain and persecution are only unbearable to those who had no purpose in life, no hope for the future; if they were withstood for the love of God, then the pain became pleasure in this world, and the sufferings became a means of being closer to God in the next. “I can now realize,” he told him, “how the Almighty is able, in the twinkling of an eye, to turn pain into ease and sorrow into gladness. Immensely exalted is His power above the weak imagining of His mortal creatures.”

Both Mullá Sádiq and Quddús withstood their torture with great fortitude. For Quddús, this was but the beginning of greater suffering to come. Exhausted and bleeding, they were driven out of Shiráz. They were warned at the city gates that if they ever returned, they would both be crucified. Mullá Sádiq and Quddús were among the first followers of the Báb to suffer persecution on Persian soil.

Release the Sun, pp: 28-29

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