Archive for the ‘Progress of soul’ Category

20 June ― 16 Núr   Leave a comment

FROM THE CENTRE OF THE COVENANT OF GOD  ‘ABDU’L-BAHÁ:

O thou bird of pleasing tones!

Thy little book of poems, which were very sweet, was read. It was a source of joy, for it was a spiritual anthem and a melody of the love of God.

Continue as long as thou canst this melody in the gatherings of the beloved; thus may the minds find rest and joy and become in tune with the love of God. When eloquence of expression, beauty of sense and sweetness of composition unite with new melodies the effect is ever great, especially if it be the anthem of the verses of oneness and the songs of praise to the Lord of Glory.

Endeavor your utmost to compose beautiful poems to be chanted with heavenly music; thus may their beauty affect the minds and impress the hearts of those who listen.

Tablets of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá v1, p. 59

MORNING:

Who is there that hath cried after Thee, and whose prayer hath remained unanswered? Where is he to be found who hath reached forth towards Thee, and whom Thou hast failed to approach? Who is he that can claim to have fixed his gaze upon Thee, and toward whom the eye of Thy loving-kindness hath not been directed? I bear witness that Thou hadst turned toward Thy servants ere they had turned toward Thee, and hadst remembered them ere they had remembered Thee. All grace is Thine, O Thou in Whose hand is the kingdom of Divine gifts and the source of every irrevocable decree.

—His Holiness Bahá’u’lláh

Prayers and Meditations by Bahá’u’lláh, p. 253

IMG_6564EVENING:

Peruse My verses with joy and radiance. Verily they will attract you unto God and will enable you to detach yourselves from aught else save Him. Thus have ye been admonished in God’s Holy Writ and in this resplendent Tablet.

From a Tablet- translated from the Arabic

—His Holiness Bahá’u’lláh

The Compilation of Compilations vol. I, p. 188

FROM THE CENTRE OF THE COVENANT, ‘ABDU’L-BAHÁ

‘Abdu’l-Bahá walking in front of Helen Goodall’s home in Oakland, California, October 12, 1912

O thou spiritual friend! Thou hast asked about the wisdom of obligatory prayer. Know thou that such prayer is mandatory and binding. Man under no pretext whatsoever is excused from observing the prayer unless he is incapable of performing it or some great obstacle interveneth. The wisdom of obligatory prayer is this: That it causeth a connection between the servant and the True One, because at that time man with all his heart and soul turneth his face towards the Almighty, seeking His association and desiring His love and companionship. For a lover, there is no greater pleasure than to converse with his beloved, and for a seeker, there is no greater bounty than intimacy with the object of his desire. It is the greatest longing of every soul who is attracted to the Kingdom of God to find time to turn with entire devotion to his Beloved, so as to seek His bounty and blessing and immerse himself in the ocean of communion, entreaty and supplication.

The Importance of Obligatory Prayer and Fasting, #VII

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17 June ― 13 Núr   Leave a comment

An illumined Tablet in the handwriting of Bahá’u’lláh “When I contemplate, O my God, the relationship that bindeth me to Thee, I am moved to proclaime to all created things ‘Verily I am God!’; and when I consider my own self, lo I find it coarser than clay!”

MORNING:

Concerning thine own affairs, if thou wouldst content thyself with whatever might come to pass it would be praiseworthy. To engage in some profession is highly commendable, for when occupied with work one is less likely to dwell on the unpleasant aspects of life. God willing thou mayest experience joy and radiance, gladness and exultation in any city or land where thou mayest happen to sojourn. This lowly servant will never forget that distinguished and kind friend. He hath remembered and will continue to remember thee. The decree lieth with God, the Lord of all worlds. I fain would hope He may vouchsafe divine assistance and grant confirmation in that which is pleasing and acceptable unto Him.

—His Holiness Bahá’u’lláh

Tablets of Bahá’u’lláh, p. 175

Bahá’í Temple. Apia, Samoa

EVENING:

It is enjoined upon every one of you to engage in some form of occupation, such as crafts, trades and the like. We have graciously exalted your engagement in such work to the rank of worship unto God, the True One. Ponder ye in your hearts the grace and the blessings of God and render thanks unto Him at eventide and at dawn. Waste not your time in idleness and sloth. Occupy yourselves with that which profiteth yourselves and others. Thus hath it been decreed in this Tablet from whose horizon the day-star of wisdom and utterance shineth resplendent.

The most despised of men in the sight of God are those who sit idly and beg. Hold ye fast unto the cord of material means, placing your whole trust in God, the Provider of all means. When anyone occupieth himself in a craft or trade, such occupation itself is regarded in the estimation of God as an act of worship; and this is naught but a token of His infinite and all-pervasive bounty.

—His Holiness Bahá’u’lláh

Tablets of Bahá’u’lláh, p. 26

‘Abdu’l-Bahá and His entourage on the main drive at Leland Stanford Junior University in Palo Alto, California, following His address on October 8, 1912

ATTRIBUTED TO  ‘ABDU’L-BAHÁ:

There are certain forms of work which are beyond human endurance and others which are within it;  and these differ according to the early environment and training of each individual…The struggling, winning, successful man is he who accustoms himself to the accomplishment of those things which are beyond human endurance.  Only a soul thus great can stand the tests of life and come out of the crucible pure and unspotted. …if one cannot raise to this height he can at least school himself to perform the tasks which are within the range of his endurance.  If a man cannot qualify in one of these two classes he becomes a social burden.

Words attributed to ‘Abdu’l-Bahá from the diary of Ahmad Sohrab

Star of the West, vol. 13, no. 10, pp: 270-271

Fire and Gold, p. 147